“What is Out There?” – The Cloaked Ship

By November 11, 2016Solaris Galactic

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Happy Thanksgiving!  This posting was early released to our newsletter subscribers.  I am grateful for their participation in my email list, and I am grateful for You being here now!  I’ve since taken some additional photographs for this post and will add them in a new posting soon.

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This is a series of unusual photographs, taken this week.

Our newsletter subscribers get a first peek at this series of photographs!  When I observed the phenomena that you see in the lead photo, above, I immediately knew that what I was seeing was unusual, a cloaked ship even, and I went to grab the camera.

The feeling of energy in the open space above the water was so…. full – as if I could feel a huge bubble of energy and presence.  I immediately knew that most likely the energy was something cloaked that I could not see, yet that was having a physical effect on the landscape.

 

The Mind Protects Us – But the Heart is Open to Possibility

I happened to witness this phenomena with another person who is also a photographer.  He takes pictures of light within abandoned buildings, hoping to capture interesting effects.  When he saw this phenomena right before his eyes, and the interruption in the ray of sunlight going across the water, he said, “Whoa, that’s scary!” And, “How could that happen?”

Then he confided in me, not knowing that I photograph lightships.  He said, “you know, it makes you wonder… wonder what is out there.”

 

A Space Where None Should BE

Note the space between the sun’s ray on the water, and the glowing sun in the foreground.

Something is interrupting the reflection of the sun’s ray, on the water.

It is afternoon, 2:45pm, and as the sun starts to sink on the horizon, the ray of the sun across the water starts in the background of this photo.  Then, suddenly, it stops and there is no sun ray at all for a significant portion of this body of water.

There are no meaningful physical protrusions that would interrupt the sun’s reflection.  And the sun is high enough in the sky that neither the curvature of the earth nor the geography would interfere with the sunlight shining across the water.

So…. nothing…. and then a bright dollop of sun in the foreground of this photo.

 

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The Sun’s Rays Shining Across Water

Here is a photo of the sun shining across a nearby section of bay.  This photo shows how the sun’s rays clearly shine in a long straight line across the water.

In the first photo, the sun’s rays don’t do that.

It could also be that the sun’s rays are not strong enough to do that in the first photo.  If so, what is causing the energy of the sun to dissipate?

 

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A Shadow Across the Water

In addition, in the first photo above you can make out an oblong shaped dark shadow reflecting on the surface of the water primarily in the center-right of the water where no sun ray is shining.

What this could be is something, perhaps a lightship, cloaked at an angle that would block the sun, and that would leave an impression or shadow on the water.

 

The Sky is Blue – No Visible Obstructions

In addition, visually, the sky is clear blue.  There are no visible obstructions that would block the ray.  The sky was completely blue this day between my vantage point and the sun, and above me and the sun.

 

The Sun’s Reflection is a Ball in the Foreground (Not a Ray)

What struck me looking at the light on the water was that the sun in the foreground isn’t a ray of light – it is an image of the ball of the sun.  This is unusual as the sun usually doesn’t look like this on the water, as you can see from the second photo above of the sunset across the water – it’s all ray.

 

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In fact, the lens flare that accompanies my photos of the sun is actually centered on the sun’s ball of light on the water – meaning that the ball of light is at higher intensity than the sun itself in this image.  This insight came from our savvy tech wiz girl Alex here at the blog, who is also a scientist.

What I observed is that the sun appears to be shining through a cloaked ship, which focuses the light of the sun into a ball.

In fact, Alex feels that the cloaking mechanism appears to intensify the energy before transmitting it to Gaia, which would explain why the light of the sun’s reflection in the foreground is more intense than the sun in the sky.

In essence, the ship is engaging in energy work that focuses energy that benefits the planet, back to Gaia.

Neat stuff, aye?

 

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Once They’ve Been Seen, the Scene Shifts

After two photos, the energy shifted, and suddenly the sun’s rays started to appear slightly across the water.  The above photo was taken within a minute of the photo at the top of this post.  Now the rays extend a bit further, but the sun’s ray is wavy.  This could be blamed on the land below the surface, but I haven’t seen this before at this location – there’s not a sandbar at that location.

Notice how the sparkles of the ray pull towards the location of the reflection of the lightship on the water (to the center-right).

I find that these phenomena react to consciousness, and once they are noticed, will shift rather quickly.  Sometimes I wonder if they are playing, seeing how shifting the effect, effects our perception.

I can only wonder if it was an effect of the movement of a cloaked ship, or the adjustment of a cloak, that causes these effects.

Two Minutes later:

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After leaving the scene for two minutes and energetically completely disconnecting, I popped back over to the water’s edge, and there it was again – no rays again across the water (above).

 

Of course, I saw this experience as an invitation to show him interesting photos of lightships… lol.

Well, that’s enough entertainment for one night!  It’s late, and I’m excited to share this all with you in the morning.

Best wishes to you, and may all your dreams of what is possible come true for you.

Love,

Solaris

 

© 2016 Solaris Modalis.  All Rights Reserved. Permission is given to share this article on other blogs and websites as long as the text is posted in its entirety without alteration and with the accompanying photos (if photos are in the repost), and with the author’s credit, copyright and live website links included in the article. Twitter handle is @SolarisModalis

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About Solaris

Solaris Modalis photographs the skies and watches the happenings there. From the changes in the sun, to communing with lightships, these are her passions. Her memories of a galactic life among the stars informs her work. Solaris shares her love of life and her wisdom, inspired by artistic photographs. After years of chasing people down to show them what was in her camera, she started this blog.

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